Dog sled racing through the landscapes of Northern Norway is an Arctic version of Formula 1 – and it is as much fun for the dogs as it is for you.

Dog power

Huskies love to run and they howl with delight when they see you, as they know that they will soon be going out for a good run. However, they quieten down as soon as team moves off, because this is precisely what they have been waiting for. Dog sled racing is an adrenaline shot, but the dogs never run so fast that you cannot handle a tumble in the snow from a sharp turn.

Short trips

A number of places organise dog sled safaris with fixed daily departures. The degree of difficulty can vary: on some tours you sit on the sled, while on others you stand on the back runners and drive the dogs yourself. Some organisers even let you harness the team, too.

Drive for yourself

After only takes a few minutes of instruction, you are ready to drive a sled yourself. It is not particularly physically demanding, but you will use your whole body and may feel healthily tired afterwards. Experienced dog-sledders ensure that everything is safe and secure, and they relate exciting stories from the great dog sled races such as Iditarod and the Finnmark Race.

Dog trip to see the Northern Lights

Many people choose the evening departures on account of the Northern Lights. Your eyes will soon become accustomed to the dark so you can appreciate the sight of the landscape by night. If the Northern Lights should appear, you will be miles from any built-up area and the associated light pollution – which means that you have the best possible conditions to enjoy this magnificent natural phenomenon.

Long trips

When the spring sun starts to warm the countryside in March, conditions are ideal for long trips that last several days or even a whole week. Accommodation is typically in lodges and mountain cabins, although there are some tougher trips with accommodation in tents.